I’ve tested quite a few web browsers in my time and had my favorites (Opera 12 and Flock) and my least favorites (like Internet Explorer and Chrome)  These days I’m using Chrome based browsers, such as Citrio, Yandex and Opera (I always come back) but one thing hasn’t changed much. Browsers keep consuming more and more memory to run.  I don’t see how some people manage with their regular PCs. (I have a custom build with 16GB of RAM and it’s still not nearly enough!) One thing that makes a huge difference is the number of extensions one adds to their browser. Each extension runs memory at all times, whether being actively used or not. I have about 4 ”essential” extensions; LastPass, uBlock, WOT and the Great Suspender. I used to also have Lightshot but I discovered they have a desktop version so now I just use that. I really do hate extensions for how much memory they hog. I’d very much prefer to use bookmarklets for most things. LastPass I wouldn’t mess with and WOT (Web of Trust) wouldn’t work well if it wasn’t integrated but it would be nice to just click a button when I wanted to suspend tabs or block ads. I do use several bookmarklets for several every day tasks; for instance, I’m using a bookmarklet to open a window and write an entry for one of my blogs…this blog entry in fact. I have one bookmarklet for each of my two WordPress blogs. I also have a StartMe bookmarklet; at the click of a button, I can add whatever page I’m on to my StartMe (bookmarking) account which is then viewable on all my browsers. I dug around for a bookmarklet for Raindrop.io that I remembered from when it first came out. I found one that was written for Apple Safari but it works great and I don’t have to waste any resources on it while I’m not using it. I wish the trend would swing back toward bookmarklets and away from extensions.

I’ve been happily using Raindrop.io for some time now, ever since my beloved Springpad was so cruelly taken from us *sniff* but I can never get the extension to work properly in Opera (and some other Chrome based web browsers) In Opera, I discovered the panel version works but the toolbar extension doesn’t (wat?) but I find it irritating to have to open a panel for one item. So instead, I found a bookmarklet script (written for Apple products originally) that works just fine for adding a bookmark to Raindrop.

Here is the script. To use copy and paste it into a new bookmark on the bookmark bar in the url box. Call it whatever you like; Raindrop or add to Raindrop works for me. Then as you are browsing and come across something you wish to save and click on your new bookmarklet. You may have to log in if you weren’t already.

Feature-rich, attractive and easy-to-use bookmarking app

Source: Raindrop.io

I reinstalled Opera lately because I was looking for a Chrome alternative. I loved Firefox (still do, and keep an alternative of it around also, called Light web browser) but I find that Chrome has better extensions for the most part and they always work better than their FF counterparts (sorry but they do, and I really am sorry)  However, Opera has its own repository for extensions and a couple of the ones I rely on weren’t there. For instance, The Great Suspender is one of my must haves. Downloading this Opera extension, aptly (if not inventively) named Download Chrome Extension. This allows chrome store extensions to be installed (with a warning dialogue about extensions from an unknown source)

No worries about the warning dialogue. Download whatever you couldn’t find in Opera. It has a reasonable margin for error. For instance, Raindrop.io is another of my must have apps (it keeps all my artwork related links for my graphic design job) and the chrome store version just doesn’t work correctly. To be fair though, it’s kind of wonky in the actual Opera extension as well. I also used Download Chrome Extension to grab Lightshot, a lightweight screenshot extension that is on my must have list also. Works just fine. Back when I was using Evernote (ha!) the chrome extension worked just fine as well. So enjoy!

Install extensions from Chrome Web Store.

Source: Download Chrome Extension extension – Opera add-ons

Can anyone send me an invitation to Dropr please?

Source: Is Dropr free? – Dropr

OneDrive’s generous 15GB storage was one of my favorite things that Microsoft has ever done. Yes, I’m harsh. And now they’ve turned right round, like a record baby, and said, NOPE! The free storage is going down to a paltry 5GB. Shameful business there. As I mentioned on a G+ community,* they could have grandfathered in everyone who previously had an account, changing to the new options for new account users. I’ve had a seriously hateful relationship with MS over the years. The large amount of free storage, along with email aliases, are the ONLY reasons I had an account.  That’s right, I’ve never had a MS account. No hotmail history for this girl!  So they lured me in with all that tasty storagey goodness and for what? So they could yank it all away?

In a nutshell, you will have only three storage plans for OneDrive: 5 GB (free), 50 GB ($2 per month), 1 TB ($10 per month or $100 per year, with Office 365).

The Internet is angry at Microsoft. After promising unlimited storage with the Office 365 subscription, and 15 GB of storage for free users, the company has reneged on its promise. All because some users abused the system.

Source: How to Move OneDrive to Google Drive After Storage Cut

**UPDATE**

I did end up receiving one email (blink and you’ll miss it) that invited me to click a link in order to keep my 15 GB of storage. This was after they took heavy PR hits for yanking it away to begin with. New users will only get 5GB, and if you were a previous user and missed the email, you’ll only have 5GB too.

 

Here’s something new that has caught the attention of many former (even current) Opera users.  The original developers of Opera Web Browser were among the hordes of people dismayed by the strip-down of Opera during its changeover to be YACC (Yet Another Chrome Clone) so they started a new project.  Basically, it’s like the old Opera, come back to life as Vivaldi – A new browser for our friends.  When it’s complete, and at the moment it’s no where near  (tech preview only stage) it will do all the glorious things that Opera 12 did, with the awesome sidebar for bookmarks, downloads, a note taking app with a built in screenshooter and yes, the mail client (which isn’t ready yet).  There will also be extensions when all is said and done.  They even brought back the community pages, which as previous Opera users remember, included a social community complete with blogs, forums, groups and more.  No joke, Vivaldi is rough at the moment.  But hey, so was Opera at first, and it ended up the power user’s dream browser.  How could it go wrong with the original programmers hard at work on it?  I have my tech preview installed, and there are weekly updates to it.  At this rate, in no time at all we will have an amazing browser that people are already starting to talk about in the user communities of Opera and Maxthon.  I’m very excited about this project!  In the meantime, head over to the community pages and join in on the conversations and make some new friends.

I was on the Opera blog earlier to see if there was anything new of note after the update.  Sadly, no.  I keep hoping, as I’ve been an Opera fangirl from the first 30 seconds I ever used it, way back in Opera 7/8.  After Opera 12, the powers that be decided to ditch everything that made Opera truly unique and be just another Chrome clone and not even that good of one. It took several updates before bookmarks worked, if that doesn’t say it all.  I digress.  So I was on the Opera blog earlier and someone made a comment mentioning Vivaldi.  I thought it was a codename for the next testing version of Opera.  Why I clicked that link, I have no idea, but I discovered that Vivaldi is a new web browser, developed by the original developers of Opera.  That right there just made my DAY! Here’s their mission statement: “We must make a new browser. A browser for ourselves and a browser for our friends. A browser that is fast, but also a browser that is rich in functionality, highly flexible and puts the user first. A browser that is made for you” 

And they aren’t playing around either.  Not only is the browser available for download (expect bugs though, it’s beta) but there is a full fledged community up and running with over 20,000 members already.  I signed up, feeling quite nostalgic as I did so.  Here’s the link for the community (which comes with a blog and webmail too)

Vivaldi.net – Welcome.

I’m off to download the browser and give it a whirl.